Rewriting Medieval Japanese Women: Politics, Personality, and Literary Production in the Life of Nun Abutsu

Christina Laffin, University of British Columbia
Christina Laffin
Monday, April 1, 2013 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
CMU 120
Rewriting Medieval Japanese Women: Politics, Personality, and Literary Production in the Life of Nun Abutsu

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday April 1, 2013
3:30 - 5:00 PM
CMU 120

Christina Laffin

Within Japanese literary history, women’s writing, which flourished during the Heian period (794–1185), is often portrayed as coming to end over the course of the Kamakura period (1185–1336). Laffin examines the status of aristocratic women and how institutional and cultural changes affected education, social mobility, and literary production by focusing on one woman, Nun Abutsu (1222-1285), and considers what her tumultuous life and many works reveal about the possibilities for women’s writing in medieval Japan.

Christina Laffin is an Associate Professor and the Canada Research Chair in Premodern Japanese Literature and Culture at the University of British Columbia. She has recently published Rewriting Medieval Japanese Women (2013) and is currently researching women’s education, physical mobility, and the role of wet nurses in twelfth to fourteenth-century Japan. Other publications include The Noh Ominameshi (co-editor, 2003) and Gender and Japanese History (managing editor, 1999).

Sponsored by UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Seattle Asian Art MuseumFor more information contact japan@uw.edu.


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